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Premature ejaculation

Premature ejaculation (PE) occurs when a man experiences orgasm and expels semen soon after sexual penetration and with minimal penile stimulation. It has also been called early ejaculation, rapid ejaculation, rapid climax, premature climax, and (historically) ejaculation praecox. There is no uniform cut-off defining "premature," but a consensus of experts at the International Society for Sexual Medicine endorsed a definition including "ejaculation which always or nearly always occurs prior to or within about one minute." The International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) applies a cut-off of 15 seconds from the beginning of intercourse.

Source: Wikipedia

What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with premature ejaculation often receive hematologic tests, urinalysis, prostate specific antigen measurement, complete physical skin exam performed (ml), glucose measurement, rectal examination, hemoglobin a1c measurement and lipid panel .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with premature ejaculation include sertraline (zoloft), paroxetine (paxil), tamsulosin (flomax), vardenafil (levitra), tadalafil (cialis), electrolyte replacement solutions, oral, terazosin, sildenafil (viagra), chlorpheniramine / phenindamine / phenylpropanolamine, mecamylamine, grepafloxacin (raxar), malathion topical and gemtuzumab (mylotarg) .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for premature ejaculation include race/ethnicity = other, age 30-44 years, sex == male and race/ethnicity = black. On the other hand, age 75+ years, age 5-14 years, and sex == female almost never get premature ejaculation.

Age

< 1 years
0.1x
1-4 years
0.1x
5-14 years
0.0x
15-29 years
0.8x
30-44 years
3.1x
45-59 years
1.1x
60-74 years
0.5x
75+ years
0.0x

Sex

Male
2.3x
Female
0.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
2.2x
Hispanic
1.0x
White
0.5x
Other
2.7x
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