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Obsessions and compulsions

The behavior of performing an act persistently and repetitively without it leading to reward or pleasure. The act is usually a small, circumscribed behavior, almost ritualistic, yet not pathologically disturbing. Examples of compulsive behavior include twirling of hair, checking something constantly, not wanting pennies in change, straightening tilted pictures, etc.

Source: MeSH

What causes it?

The most common causes of obsessions and compulsions are attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (adhd), obsessive compulsive disorder (ocd), and bipolar disorder. Other possible causes, such as personality disorder, are more rare.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with obsessions and compulsions often receive psychotherapy, mental health counseling, depression screen, magnetic resonance imaging, occupational therapy assessment, electroencephalogram (eeg) and psychological and psychiatric evaluation and therapy .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with obsessions and compulsions include risperidone, methylphenidate, aripiprazole (abilify), adderall, lamotrigine (lamictal), venlafaxine (effexor), fluvoxamine (luvox), mirtazapine, lisdexamfetamine (vyvanse), dexmethylphenidate (focalin), atomoxetine (strattera), oxcarbazepine (trileptal) and chloral hydrate .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for obsessions and compulsions include age 5-14 years.

Age

< 1 years
0.3x
1-4 years
0.9x
5-14 years
3.7x
15-29 years
0.9x
30-44 years
1.2x
45-59 years
0.7x
60-74 years
0.4x
75+ years
0.3x

Sex

Male
1.4x
Female
0.7x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.6x
Hispanic
0.7x
White
1.2x
Other
0.9x
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