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Low urine output

Also known as Small urine volume, Oliguria, and Decreased urine

Oliguria or hypouresis (both names from roots meaning "not enough urine") is the low output of urine. In humans, it is clinically classified as an output below 300-500ml/day. The decreased output of urine may be a sign of dehydration, renal failure, hypovolemic shock, HHNS hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, urinary obstruction/urinary retention, DKA, pre-eclampsia, and urinary tract infections, among other conditions.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of low urine output are urinary tract infection, hypovolemia, and acute kidney injury. Other possible causes, such as otitis media, are more rare.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with low urine output often receive urinalysis, hematologic tests, complete blood count, electrolytes panel, kidney function tests, intravenous fluid replacement, glucose measurement and insertion of catheter into urinary bladder .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with low urine output include phenazopyridine (azo), sodium phosphate / sodium phosphate, monobasic, dobutamine, alclometasone topical, mexiletine, iron polysaccharide, mineral oil (stye), tacrolimus topical product, atenolol / chlorthalidone, ramelteon (rozerem), hydrochlorothiazide / olmesartan, efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir and diatrizoate .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for low urine output include age 75+ years, age 1-4 years and age < 1 years.

Age

< 1 years
4.4x
1-4 years
2.3x
5-14 years
0.6x
15-29 years
0.5x
30-44 years
0.6x
45-59 years
0.6x
60-74 years
0.9x
75+ years
2.1x

Sex

Male
1.3x
Female
0.8x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.6x
Hispanic
0.8x
White
1.2x
Other
0.8x
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