Loss of sensation

Also known as Numbness, Loss of feeling, and Anesthesia

Hypoesthesia (or hypesthesia) refers to a reduced sense of touch or sensation, or a partial loss of sensitivity to sensory stimuli. In everyday speech this is sometimes referred to as "numbness".

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of loss of sensation are carpal tunnel syndrome, mononeuritis, and chronic back pain. Other possible causes, such as complex regional pain syndrome, are more rare.

What symptoms are related?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with loss of sensation, 51% report having paresthesia, 45% report having symptoms of the face, and 37% report having headache.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with loss of sensation often receive radiographic imaging procedure, hematologic tests, complete blood count, plain x-ray, electrocardiogram, glucose measurement, x-ray computed tomography and kidney function tests .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with loss of sensation include trifluoperazine (stelazine), medrysone ophthalmic, lyme disease vaccine, quinacrine, acetaminophen / chlorpheniramine / phenylpropanolamine, gadopentetate dimeglumine (magnevist), amprenavir, calcifediol, acetaminophen / pentazocine, methyltestosterone (android), dextran 1, rotigotine (neupro) and rifabutin .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for loss of sensation include age 45-59 years. On the other hand, age 1-4 years and age < 1 years almost never get loss of sensation.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.1x
15-29 years
0.7x
30-44 years
1.4x
45-59 years
1.7x
60-74 years
1.2x
75+ years
0.9x

Sex

Male
1.0x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.9x
Hispanic
0.8x
White
1.1x
Other
0.9x
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