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Incontinence of stool

Also known as Encopresis and Leaking stools

Encopresis (from the Ancient Greek ἐγκόπρησις / egkóprēsis (), also known as paradoxical diarrhea) is voluntary or involuntary fecal soiling in children who have usually already been toilet trained. Persons with encopresis often leak stool into their undergarments.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of incontinence of stool are chronic constipation, diabetes, and urinary tract infection. Other possible causes, such as decubitus ulcer, are more rare.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with incontinence of stool often receive rectal examination, glucose measurement, intravenous fluid replacement, electrolytes panel, kidney function tests, pelvis exam, cardiac enzymes measurement and other diagnostic procedures (interview; evaluation; consultation) .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with incontinence of stool include polyethylene glycol 3350 (miralax), sodium phosphate / sodium phosphate, monobasic, psyllium, zosyn, loperamide (imodium), rifaximin, plasma protein fraction (plasmanate), nafcillin, meropenem, tegaserod (zelnorm), sodium phosphate, mineral oil (stye) and methylcellulose (citrucel) .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for incontinence of stool include age 5-14 years. On the other hand, age < 1 years almost never get incontinence of stool.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.9x
5-14 years
3.4x
15-29 years
0.1x
30-44 years
0.7x
45-59 years
1.1x
60-74 years
1.1x
75+ years
1.5x

Sex

Male
1.1x
Female
0.9x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.9x
Hispanic
0.9x
White
1.1x
Other
0.8x
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