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Focal weakness

Also known as Facial drooping, Weakness on one side of body, Face weakness, and Focal weakness

A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.

Source: MeSH

What causes it?

The most common causes of focal weakness are stroke, bell palsy, and transient ischemic attack. Other possible causes, such as epilepsy, are more rare.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with focal weakness often receive radiographic imaging procedure, hematologic tests, complete blood count, x-ray computed tomography, electrocardiogram, kidney function tests, cat scan of head and glucose measurement .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with focal weakness include acyclovir, aspirin / dipyridamole, valacyclovir (valtrex), pyridostigmine (mestinon), famciclovir, fosphenytoin, alteplase, bethanechol, ramelteon (rozerem), lyme disease vaccine, dextran 1, hypromellose (genteal) and eprosartan (teveten) .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for focal weakness include age 75+ years age 60-74 years. On the other hand, age < 1 years almost never get focal weakness.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.1x
5-14 years
0.2x
15-29 years
0.3x
30-44 years
0.7x
45-59 years
1.3x
60-74 years
1.7x
75+ years
2.9x

Sex

Male
1.0x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.2x
Hispanic
0.7x
White
1.0x
Other
0.9x
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