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Difficulty speaking

Also known as Groping for words, Trouble talking, Aphasia, Verbal apraxia, Unable to talk, and Sudden inability to speak

Aphasia (/əˈfeɪʒə/, /əˈfeɪziə/ or /eɪˈfeɪziə/; from ancient Greek aphatos meaning ἀφασία (ἄφατος, ἀ- + φημί), "speechlessness", derived from phat meaning "spoken") is a disturbance of the comprehension and formulation of language caused by dysfunction in specific brain regions. This class of language disorder ranges from having difficulty remembering words to losing the ability to speak, read, or write. This also affects visual language such as sign language. Aphasia is usually linked to brain damage, most commonly by stroke. Brain damage linked to aphasia can also cause further brain diseases, including cancer, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of difficulty speaking are stroke, transient ischemic attack, and developmental disability. Other possible causes, such as conductive hearing loss, are more rare.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with difficulty speaking often receive hematologic tests, radiographic imaging procedure, complete blood count, x-ray computed tomography, electrocardiogram, glucose measurement, kidney function tests and electrolytes panel .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with difficulty speaking include aspirin / dipyridamole, balsam peru/castor oil/trypsin topical, rivastigmine (exelon), temozolomide, papain-urea topical, galantamine, fosphenytoin, pentobarbital, nimodipine, rotigotine (neupro), creatine, alteplase and riluzole .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for difficulty speaking include age 75+ years age 1-4 years.

Age

< 1 years
0.2x
1-4 years
2.7x
5-14 years
1.1x
15-29 years
0.3x
30-44 years
0.5x
45-59 years
0.7x
60-74 years
1.5x
75+ years
2.4x

Sex

Male
1.1x
Female
0.9x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.0x
Hispanic
0.7x
White
1.1x
Other
1.2x
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