Depressive or psychotic symptoms

Also known as Blunted affect, Constricted affect, Difficulty concentrating, Going crazy, Hate everybody, Inhibited, and Mood fluctuation

Blunted affect is the scientific term describing a lack of emotional reactivity (affect display) on the part of an individual. It is manifest as a failure to express feelings either verbally or non-verbally, especially when talking about issues that would normally be expected to engage the emotions. Expressive gestures are rare and there is little animation in facial expression or vocal inflection.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of depressive or psychotic symptoms are depression, bipolar disorder, and psychotic disorder. Other possible causes, such as personality disorder, are more rare.

What symptoms are related?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with depressive or psychotic symptoms, 61% report having depression, 38% report having anxiety and nervousness, and 27% report having delusions or hallucinations.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with depressive or psychotic symptoms often receive hematologic tests, complete blood count, urinalysis, glucose measurement, kidney function tests, electrolytes panel, psychotherapy and electrocardiogram .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with depressive or psychotic symptoms include aripiprazole (abilify), haloperidol, olanzapine (zyprexa), benztropine, thiamine, ziprasidone (geodon), naloxone (suboxone), perphenazine, sodium salicylate, asenapine (saphris), molindone (moban), ustekinumab (stelara) and sodium phenylbutyrate (phenylbutyrate) .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for depressive or psychotic symptoms include .

Age

< 1 years
0.1x
1-4 years
0.3x
5-14 years
1.1x
15-29 years
1.1x
30-44 years
1.2x
45-59 years
1.1x
60-74 years
0.7x
75+ years
1.1x

Sex

Male
1.2x
Female
0.9x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.0x
Hispanic
0.7x
White
1.1x
Other
0.9x
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