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Decreased heart rate

Also known as Pulse too slow, Slow heart, BradycardiaSlow Pulse, and Slow Heart Beat

Bradycardia (/ˌbrædɪˈkɑrdiə/; from the Greek βραδύς, bradys "slow", and καρδία, kardia, "heart"), in the context of adult medicine, is the resting heart rate of under 60 beats per minute (BPM), although it is seldom symptomatic until the rate drops below 50 BPM. It sometimes results in fatigue, weakness, dizziness and at very low rates fainting. A waking heart rate below 40 BPM is considered absolute bradycardia.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of decreased heart rate are sinus bradycardia, heart failure, and high blood pressure. Other possible causes, such as heart block, are more rare.

What symptoms are related?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with decreased heart rate, 54% report having shortness of breath, 42% report having dizziness, and 34% report having fainting.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with decreased heart rate often receive hematologic tests, complete blood count, radiographic imaging procedure, electrocardiogram, plain x-ray, kidney function tests, cardiac enzymes measurement and glucose measurement .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with decreased heart rate include atropine (uaa), glucagon, sodium polystyrene sulfonate (kayexalate), dopamine, sodium bicarbonate, sotalol, felodipine, isoproterenol, insulin aspart-insulin aspart protamine, dimenhydrinate (dramamine), prazosin, lutein and dorzolamide ophthalmic .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for decreased heart rate include age 75+ years age 60-74 years. On the other hand, age 1-4 years almost never get decreased heart rate.

Age

< 1 years
0.3x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.4x
15-29 years
0.5x
30-44 years
0.3x
45-59 years
0.5x
60-74 years
1.7x
75+ years
4.9x

Sex

Male
1.1x
Female
0.9x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.6x
Hispanic
0.6x
White
1.3x
Other
0.7x
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