Decreased appetite

Also known as Loss of appetite, Not hungry anymore, and Anorexic

Anorexia (deriving from the Greek "α(ν)-" (a(n)-, a prefix that denotes absence) + "όρεξη" (orexe) = appetite) is the decreased sensation of appetite. While the term in non-scientific publications is often used interchangeably with anorexia nervosa, many possible causes exist for a decreased appetite, some of which may be harmless, while others indicate a serious clinical condition or pose a significant risk.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of decreased appetite are common cold, otitis media, and hypovolemia. Other possible causes, such as chronic constipation, are more rare.

What symptoms are related?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with decreased appetite, 73% report having fever, 54% report having vomiting, and 50% report having cough.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with decreased appetite often receive hematologic tests, complete blood count, urinalysis, intravenous fluid replacement, glucose measurement, electrolytes panel, kidney function tests and electrocardiogram .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with decreased appetite include megestrol (megace), temozolomide, tetrahydrocannabinol (marinol), dopamine, brompheniramine / dextromethorphan / guaifenesin / pseudoephedrine, carbinoxamine (dmax), ephedrine / phenobarbital / theophylline, immunoglobulins, intravenous (gammagard), lipase, stavudine (zerit), cefamandole (mandol), cisapride and amikacin .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for decreased appetite include age 1-4 years age < 1 years.

Age

< 1 years
3.9x
1-4 years
4.9x
5-14 years
1.0x
15-29 years
0.5x
30-44 years
0.4x
45-59 years
0.5x
60-74 years
0.7x
75+ years
1.5x

Sex

Male
1.1x
Female
0.9x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.0x
Hispanic
1.3x
White
0.9x
Other
1.2x
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