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Cross-eyed

Also known as Esotropia and Esodeviation

Esotropia is a form of strabismus, or "squint", in which one or both eyes turns inward. The condition can be constantly present, or occur intermittently, and can give the affected individual a "cross-eyed" appearance. Esotropia is sometimes erroneously called "lazy eye", which describes the condition of amblyopia—a reduction in vision of one or both eyes that is not the result of any pathological lesion of the visual pathway and cannot be resolved by the use of corrective lenses. Amblyopia can, however, arise as a result of esotropia occurring in childhood: In order to relieve symptoms of diplopia or double vision, the child's brain will ignore or "suppress" the image from the esotropic eye, which when allowed to continue untreated will lead to the development of amblyopia. Treatment options for esotropia include glasses to correct refractive errors (see accommodative esotropia below), the use of prisms and/or orthoptic exercises and/or eye muscle surgery.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of cross-eyed are eye alignment disorder, astigmatism, and amblyopia. Other possible causes, such as myopia, are more rare.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with cross-eyed often receive other extraocular muscle and orbit therapeutic procedures, ophthalmologic and otologic diagnosis and treatment, magnetic resonance imaging, corneal transplant, procedures on spleen, removal of ectopic pregnancy, tracheostomy; temporary and permanent and diagnostic endocrine procedures .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with cross-eyed include haemophilus b conjugate vaccine (obsolete), chlorpheniramine / phenindamine / phenylpropanolamine, mecamylamine, grepafloxacin (raxar), malathion topical, gemtuzumab (mylotarg), gadoteridol (prohance), carbinoxamine / dextromethorphan / phenylephrine, devil's claw preparation, isocarboxazid (marplan), medrysone ophthalmic, magnesium lactate and ethynodiol .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for cross-eyed include race/ethnicity = other, age 1-4 years, race/ethnicity = black and age < 1 years. On the other hand, age 30-44 years, age 75+ years, age 60-74 years, age 15-29 years, and age 45-59 years almost never get cross-eyed.

Age

< 1 years
7.1x
1-4 years
11.1x
5-14 years
1.1x
15-29 years
0.0x
30-44 years
0.0x
45-59 years
0.0x
60-74 years
0.0x
75+ years
0.0x

Sex

Male
1.0x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.7x
Hispanic
0.9x
White
0.7x
Other
1.8x
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