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Coryza

Also known as Rhinorrhea, Coryza, Drippy nose, Sniffles, Nasal Discharge, Nasal Catarrh, Discharge From Nose, Snuffles, Nose Run, and Dripping Nose

Coryza is a word describing the symptoms of a "cold". It describes the inflammation of the mucous membranes lining the nasal cavity which usually gives rise to the symptoms of nasal congestion and loss of smell, among other symptoms. Coryza may not always have an infectious or allergenic etiology and can be due to something as innocuous as a cold wind, spicy food or tender points in the muscles of the neck such as the sternocleidomastoid. It is also a symptom of narcotic withdrawal. Coryza is classically used in association with the "four Cs" of measles infection: cough, conjunctivitis, Koplik's spots, and coryza.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of coryza are common cold, otitis media, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (copd). Other possible causes, such as pneumonia, are more rare.

What symptoms are related?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with coryza, 78% report having cough, 58% report having fever, and 50% report having nasal congestion.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with coryza often receive other diagnostic procedures (interview; evaluation; consultation), nebulizer therapy, influenzavirus antibody assay, other respiratory therapy, physical therapy exercises; manipulation; and other procedures, diagnostic procedures on nose; mouth and pharynx, plastic procedures on nose and incision of pleura; thoracentesis; chest drainage .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with coryza include guaifenesin (mucinex), robitussin ac, codeine / promethazine, robitussin dm, brompheniramine / dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine, dextromethorphan (duramax), guaifenesin / phenylephrine / phenylpropanolamine, guaifenesin / hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine / pseudoephedrine, carbinoxamine / dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine, pheniramine / phenylpropanolamine / pyrilamine, chlorpheniramine / dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine and chlorpheniramine / methscopolamine / pseudoephedrine .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for coryza include age 1-4 years age < 1 years.

Age

< 1 years
3.5x
1-4 years
3.0x
5-14 years
1.4x
15-29 years
0.8x
30-44 years
0.8x
45-59 years
0.8x
60-74 years
0.6x
75+ years
0.4x

Sex

Male
1.0x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.3x
Hispanic
1.0x
White
0.9x
Other
1.1x
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