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Abnormal breathing sounds

Also known as Rales, Rattled breathing, Rhonchi, and Stridor

Crackles, crepitations, or rales (i/ˈrɑːls/ RAHLS or /ˈræls/ RALS) are the clicking, rattling, or crackling noises that may be made by one or both lungs of a human with a respiratory disease during inhalation. They are often heard only with a stethoscope ("on auscultation"). Bilateral crackles refers to the presence of crackles in both lungs.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of abnormal breathing sounds are obstructive sleep apnea (osa), tonsillar hypertrophy, and obesity. Other possible causes, such as tonsillitis, are more rare.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with abnormal breathing sounds often receive other diagnostic procedures (interview; evaluation; consultation), other therapeutic procedures on eyelids; conjunctiva; cornea, excision, electroencephalogram (eeg), echocardiography, tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, ophthalmologic and otologic diagnosis and treatment and diagnostic procedures on nose; mouth and pharynx .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with abnormal breathing sounds include zaleplon (sonata), oxymetazoline nasal, carbidopa / levodopa, ropinirole, acetaminophen / pseudoephedrine, ciclesonide nasal, drospirenone-estradiol, iodinated glycerol (organidin), aminolevulinic acid topical, adefovir, bilberry extract, cinnamon preparation and methylsulfonylmethane .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for abnormal breathing sounds include age 45-59 years.

Age

< 1 years
0.9x
1-4 years
0.9x
5-14 years
0.9x
15-29 years
0.3x
30-44 years
1.1x
45-59 years
1.7x
60-74 years
1.2x
75+ years
0.5x

Sex

Male
1.3x
Female
0.8x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.0x
Hispanic
0.7x
White
1.1x
Other
0.7x
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