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Sucralfate (Carafate)

Also known as Carafate


Sucralfate is a cytoprotective agent, an oral gastrointestinal medication primarily indicated for the treatment of active duodenal ulcers. Brand names include Sucramal in Italy; Carafate in U.S.A.; Pepsigard, Sucral, Sucrafil, Hapifate in India; Sutra or Musin in parts of South-East Asia; Sulcrate in Canada; Ulsanic in South Africa and Israel; and Antepsin in Turkey. Sucralfate is also used for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and stress ulcers. Unlike the other classes of medications used for treatment of peptic ulcers, sucralfate is a sucrose sulfate-aluminium complex that binds to the mucosa, thus creating a physical barrier that impairs diffusion of hydrochloric acid in the gastrointestinal tract and prevents degradation of mucus by acid. It also stimulates bicarbonate output and acts like an acid buffer with cytoprotective properties. Sucralfate was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1981.

Source: Wikipedia

Estimated Total Cost: $49.35 for an average of 28 days supply

What is it prescribed for?

Patients are most commonly prescribed sucralfate to treat gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd), upper abdominal pain, and gastroduodenal ulcer.

What drug interactions are known?

Do not take sucralfate if you are taking any of the following:

Critical Interactions


Significant Interactions

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