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Paresthesia

Also known as Burning feeling, Burning sensation, Prickly feeling, Stinging feeling, Abnormal sensations, Tingling sensation, and Feeling of pins and needles

Paresthesia (/ˌpærɨsˈθiːziə/ or /ˌpærɨsˈθiːʒə/), is a sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect. The manifestation of a paresthesia may be transient or chronic.

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of paresthesia are carpal tunnel syndrome, sprain or strain, and peripheral nerve disorder. Other possible causes, such as complex regional pain syndrome, are more rare.

What symptoms are related?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with paresthesia, 73% report having loss of sensation, 33% report having leg pain, and 31% report having sharp chest pain.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with paresthesia often receive radiographic imaging procedure, complete blood count, electrocardiogram, glucose measurement, electrolytes panel, kidney function tests, x-ray computed tomography and cardiac enzymes measurement .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with paresthesia include vitamin a, tiagabine (gabitril), reteplase, silver protein mild topical, denileukin diftitox (ontak), tapentadol (nucynta), urofollitropin (bravelle), amitriptyline / chlordiazepoxide, iron carbonyl (icar), estrone (estrogenic), betamethasone, estazolam and flurbiprofen .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for paresthesia include age 45-59 years. On the other hand, age 1-4 years and age < 1 years almost never get paresthesia.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.3x
15-29 years
0.7x
30-44 years
1.3x
45-59 years
1.5x
60-74 years
1.3x
75+ years
1.0x

Sex

Male
0.9x
Female
1.1x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.1x
Hispanic
0.7x
White
1.1x
Other
0.8x
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