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Nausea

Also known as Feel like throwing up, Nervous stomach, Sick to stomach, Upset stomach, and Stomach ache

Nausea (Latin nausea, from Greek ναυσία - nausia, "ναυτία" - nautia, motion sickness", "feeling sick," "queasy" or "wamble") is a sensation of unease and discomfort in the upper stomach with an involuntary urge to vomit. It often, but not always, precedes vomiting. A person can suffer nausea without vomiting. (Greek ναῦς - naus, "ship"; ναυσία started as meaning "seasickness".)

Source: Wikipedia

What causes it?

The most common causes of nausea are noninfectious gastroenteritis, hypovolemia, and urinary tract infection. Other possible causes, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd), are more rare.

What symptoms are related?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with nausea, 88% report having vomiting, 69% report having sharp abdominal pain, and 58% report having diarrhea.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with nausea often receive hematologic tests, complete blood count, intravenous fluid replacement, radiographic imaging procedure, urinalysis, kidney function tests, glucose measurement and electrolytes panel .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with nausea include ondansetron (zofran), promethazine, metoclopramide, prochlorperazine (compro), loperamide (imodium), atropine / diphenoxylate, atropine / hyoscyamine / phenobarbital / scopolamine, trimethobenzamide (tigan), dolasetron (anzemet), bismuth subsalicylate (pepto-bismol), dimenhydrinate (dramamine), kaolin / pectin and digitoxin .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for nausea include .

Age

< 1 years
0.3x
1-4 years
0.4x
5-14 years
0.7x
15-29 years
1.4x
30-44 years
1.3x
45-59 years
1.0x
60-74 years
0.8x
75+ years
1.0x

Sex

Male
0.8x
Female
1.2x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.9x
Hispanic
0.8x
White
1.1x
Other
0.9x
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