Listing conditions

Displaying 251 - 300 of 801 in total

Fat embolism
A piece of fatty tissue that has traveled through the circulatory system and become lodged inside of an artery or vein, interrupting blood flow to part of the body. It typically occurs after physical injury that breaks or crushes bones or soft tissue. It can cause permanent damage to the organs and tissues.
Female genitalia infection
An umbrella term for any infection of the external female sexual organs, including the labia majora, labia minora, and clitoris. The most common infections (though not all) are due to sexually transmitted diseases, such as gonorrhea or chlamydia.
Female infertility of unknown cause
Infertility is defined as an inability to conceive after regular unprotected sexual intercourse for 12 months. In 20% of cases, the underlying problem cannot be found.
Fetal alcohol syndrome
A condition in children due to intake of alcohol by the mother during pregnancy. There are a number of features, including physical deformity and mental retardation.
Fibroadenoma
A non-dangerous lump of tissue that can develop in the breasts of women (and sometimes men). Unlike breast cancers, these often grow and shrink based on a woman's menstrual cycle (i.e. "the period").
Fibrocystic breast disease
A common, non-dangerous condition marked by development of lumps in the breast. These lumps can characteristically expand and cause pain during certain portions of a woman's menstrual cycle (i.e. "the period).
Fibromyalgia
A syndrome characterized by 'trigger points' which are overly painful to the touch. Fibromyalgia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome and often coexists with depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Flat feet
A deformity of the foot in which the tendons and ligaments do not form the arch of the sole of the feet. In many people, no arch is ever formed. In some people, the arch collapses over time. Flat feet are often corrected through various mechanisms such as orthotics, though evidence is not conclusive that there is any increased risk of injury.
Floaters
Small deposits that float inside of the eye, common with aging, leading to the perception of bright squiggly lines in the visual field. They are typically not dangerous.
Flu
A common virus that causes infection of the nose and throat. The virus mutates, leading to new strains every year. Occasionally it can "jump" species, leading to recent outbreaks of avian or swine flu. Influenza can be deadly in some populations, such as the elderly or young children. A vaccine is available.
Fluid overload
A medical condition in which there is too much fluid in the blood. There are a variety of causes, including too much IV fluids intake, heart failure, liver damage, and certain kidney conditions.
Folate deficiency
Low levels of the essential vitamin B9, also known as folic acid. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, most importantly anemia. Folate deficiency in pregnant women can lead to severe birth defects in the child if not corrected. Causes of folate deficiency include certain medications, intestinal conditions decreasing absorption, low intake, and conditions that increase the need for folate.
Food allergy
An intolerance to certain foods, triggered by the immune system, leading to trouble breathing or swallowing, abdominal pain, skin rash, diarrhea, or vomiting. Not all poor reactions to specific foods (such as lactose intolerance or celiac disease) are allergies.
Foreign body in the ear
A condition in which an object originating outside of the body is stuck in the ear canal. This is common in children; in adults it is often due to parts of hearing aids or ear cleaning devices. Objects often need to be removed by physicians.
Foreign body in the eye
A condition in which an object originating outside of the body is stuck in the eye socket. This may be a contact lens, a splinter, etc. Foreign bodies often cause irritation to the eye, and if not removed, may lead to infections.
Foreign body in the gastrointestinal tract
A condition in which an object originating outside of the body is stuck in the digestive tract (i.e. the gut). This may be something inedible that is swallowed or something inserted into the anus during sexual activity. If the object does not pass naturally, it may need to be removed by a physician.
Foreign body in the nose
A condition in which an object originating outside of the body is stuck in the nasal canal. This is common in children, and objects often need to be removed by a physician to prevent infection.
Foreign body in the throat
A life-threatening emergency in which an object is stuck in the throat. The object itself can impair breathing, or the swelling of the tissues around the object can lead to severe respiratory distress
Foreign body in the vagina
A condition in which an object originating outside of the body is stuck in the vaginal canal. This is commonly due to forgotten tampons. The object should be removed immediately to prevent serious infections, such as toxic shock syndrome.
Fracture of the ankle
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the ankle (lower leg or upper foot). These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the arm
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the arm (upper arm or forearm). These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the facial bones
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the face. These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the finger
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the fingers. These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the foot
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the foot. These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the hand
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the hand. These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the jaw
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the jaw. These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the leg
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the leg (thigh or lower leg). These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the neck
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the spine at the neck. These are typically caused by large impact injuries and can be dangerous if there is damage to the spinal cord.
Fracture of the patella
A break or crack in the knee cap. These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to the bone breaking into many pieces.
Fracture of the pelvis
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the hip girdle. These are typically caused by serious impact injuries and can be very dangerous due to internal bleeding.
Fracture of the rib
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the arm (upper arm or forearm). These are typically caused by impact injuries to the side and can vary from a small crack to the bone breaking off and puncturing the lung.
Fracture of the shoulder
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the shoulder (upper arm, shoulder blade, or collarbone). These are typically caused by impact injuries and can vary from a small crack in the bone to a part of the bone shattering.
Fracture of the skull
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the skull. These are typically caused by impact injuries and can be very dangerous if the force was strong enough to damage underlying brain tissues.
Fracture of the vertebra
A break or crack anywhere in the bones of the spine. These are typically caused by major impact injuries and can be dangerous if associated with damage to the spinal cord.
Friedrich ataxia
A genetic disease that runs in families, leading to progressive damage to the nervous system and problems with walking and speech. It does not affect thinking ability.
Frostbite
Damage to the skin or other tissues due to freezing. Cold temperatures cause blood vessels near the skin to contract in order to preserve body temperature. If exposed to cold temperatures for long enough, this lack of blood flow leads to cell death. Tissues farthest from the heart (such as the fingers and toes) are affected first. If severe enough, treatment involves amputation, to prevent infection.
Fungal infection of the hair
Also known as "tinea capitis," this is caused by the same fungus as athlete's foot, but the infection of the hair follicles causes temporary hair loss in the affected region in addition to itching.
Fungal infection of the skin
A very common disease and includes athlete's foot, jock itch, and ringworm infection (not truly a worm). Itching, skin flaking and changes in skin color in the affected area are hallmark signs. Rare fungal infections with Rhizopus can be very serious.
G6PD enzyme deficiency
A genetic disorder that runs in families, in which red blood cells, the cells that carry oxygen to the tissues, break down prematurely. This leads to anemia, or low red blood cell count, and its associated complications. It is caused by a defect in a particular enzyme, glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase, and symptoms are often triggered by certain events such as ingestion of fava beans.
Galactorrhea of unknown cause
Galactorrhea is the spontaneous flow of milk from the breasts in those not pregnant or breastfeeding. It can occur in either men or women. It is said to be of unknown cause when a cause cannot be determined despite adequate workup by a physician.
Gallbladder cancer
A malignant transformations of tissues in the gallbladder, a structure that houses bile salts which help with digestion of fatty foods. This form of cancer is relatively rare and diagnosis is often made late in its staging.
Gallbladder disease
A disorder of the gallbladder, a small organ under the liver that helps with digestion. This includes inflammation or infection of the gallbladder, gallbladder cancers, and gallstones.
Gallstone
The gall bladder is a structure that holds bile, a compound released for digestion of fats. Sometimes the bile collects forming gallstones. Many people have gallstones without any symptoms. However, they can sometimes cause blockages or lead to infections.
Ganglion cyst
A non-dangerous lump of soft tissue, typically around the joints or tendons of the hands or feet. It is caused by fluid leaking from the joint into the surrounding tissue.
Gas gangrene
A fast-spreading, potentially deadly disease caused by infection by certain bacteria leading to death of tissues, most often the skin and tissues directly under the skin. It typically requires surgery to remove infected tissue.
Gastritis
An inflammation of the wall of the stomach. It is usually the end result of the stomach acid overcoming the mucous barrier which protects the lining of the stomach. Causes include excessive alcohol, NSAIDs, steroids, and infection with H. Pylori.
Gastroduodenal ulcer
An inflammation of the wall of the stomach. It is usually the end result of the stomach acid overcoming the mucous barrier which protects the lining of the stomach. Causes include excessive alcohol, NSAIDs, steroids, and infection with H. Pylori.
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
Flow of acidic stomach contents up the esophagus, causing irritation of its lining. Symptoms can be as subtle as a chronic cough or strong enough to mimic a heart attack.
Gastrointestinal hemorrhage
Flow of acidic stomach contents up the esophagus (the tube that takes food from the mouth to the stomach), causing irritation of its lining. Symptoms can be as subtle as a chronic cough or strong enough to mimic a heart attack.
Gastroparesis
A medical condition consisting of partial paralysis of the stomach, resulting in food remaining in the stomach for a longer period of time than normal. This can be a permanent complication of diabetes.
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