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Stye

Also known as Hordeolum and Hordeolum Externum

An external stye or sty /ˈstaɪ/, also hordeolum /hɔrˈdiːələm/, is an infection of the sebaceous glands of Zeis at the base of the eyelashes, or an infection of the apocrine sweat glands of Moll. External styes form on the outside of the lids and can be seen as small red bumps. Internal styes are infections of the meibomian sebaceous glands lining the inside of the eyelids. They also cause a red bump underneath the lid with only generalized redness and swelling visible on the outside. Styes are similar to chalazia, but tend to be of smaller size and are more painful and usually produce no lasting damage. They contain water and pus and the bacteria will spread if the stye is forcefully ruptured. Styes are characterized by an acute onset and usually short in duration (7–10 days without treatment) compared to chalazia that are chronic and usually do not resolve without intervention. Styes are usually caused by staphylococcus aureus bacterium.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with stye, 74% report having pain in eye, 73% report having swollen eye, and 60% report having eye redness. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of stye are pain in eye, swollen eye, eye redness, eyelid swelling, symptoms of eye, mass on eyelid, itchiness of eye, eyelid lesion or rash, and eye burns or stings, although you may still have stye without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with stye often receive physical therapy exercises; manipulation; and other procedures, incision and drainage, ophthalmic examination and evaluation, nonoperative removal of foreign body, culture wound and other or therapeutic nervous system procedures .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with stye include erythromycin, erythromycin ophthalmic, sodium sulfacetamide ophthalmic, gentamicin ophthalmic, tobramycin ophthalmic, tobramycin (tobi), tetracaine (one touch), dexamethasone-tobramycin ophthalmic, gentamicins (gentamicin), tetrahydrozoline ophthalmic, fluorescein ophthalmic, proparacaine ophthalmic and gramicidin/neomycin/polymyxin b ophthalmic .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for stye include age 5-14 years, age 1-4 years and age 15-29 years.

Age

< 1 years
0.8x
1-4 years
2.1x
5-14 years
1.8x
15-29 years
1.5x
30-44 years
0.9x
45-59 years
0.7x
60-74 years
0.5x
75+ years
0.3x

Sex

Male
1.0x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.3x
Hispanic
1.0x
White
0.9x
Other
1.2x
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