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Spinal stenosis

Also known as Spinal Narrowing

Spinal stenosis is an abnormal narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal canal that may occur in any of the regions of the spine. This narrowing causes a restriction to the spinal canal, resulting in a neurological deficit. Symptoms include pain, numbness, paraesthesia, and loss of motor control. The location of the stenosis determines which area of the body is affected. With spinal stenosis, the spinal canal is narrowed at the vertebral canal, which is a foramen between the vertebrae where the spinal cord (in the cervical or thoracic spine) or nerve roots (in the lumbar spine) pass through. There are several types of spinal stenosis: lumbar stenosis and cervical stenosis being the most frequent. While lumbar spinal stenosis is more common, cervical spinal stenosis is more dangerous because it involves compression of the spinal cord whereas the lumbar spinal stenosis involves compression of the cauda equina.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with spinal stenosis, 87% report having neck pain, 71% report having back pain, and 52% report having low back pain. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of spinal stenosis are neck pain, although you may still have spinal stenosis without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with spinal stenosis often receive radiographic imaging procedure, plain x-ray, magnetic resonance imaging, physical therapy exercises, x-ray computed tomography, other diagnostic procedures (interview; evaluation; consultation), insertion of catheter or spinal stimulator and injection into spinal canal and cat scan of head .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with spinal stenosis include carisoprodol (soma), iohexol (omnipaque), iopamidol (isovue), diclofenac topical product, hydrochlorothiazide / telmisartan, chlorzoxazone, moexipril, methyl salicylate-menthol topical, tolmetin, ropivacaine, alfentanil, trimethadione and choline .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for spinal stenosis include age 60-74 years age 45-59 years. On the other hand, age 1-4 years and age < 1 years almost never get spinal stenosis.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.2x
15-29 years
0.5x
30-44 years
1.2x
45-59 years
1.6x
60-74 years
1.5x
75+ years
1.4x

Sex

Male
1.0x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.8x
Hispanic
0.6x
White
1.2x
Other
0.8x
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