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Seasonal allergies (hay fever)

Also known as Hay Fever, Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis, and Pollenosis

Hay Fever is a comic play written by Noël Coward in 1924 and first produced in 1925 with Marie Tempest as the first Judith Bliss. Laura Hope Crews played the role in New York. Best described as a cross between high farce and a comedy of manners, the play is set in an English country house in the 1920s, and deals with the four eccentric members of the Bliss family and their outlandish behaviour when they each invite a guest to spend the weekend. The self-centred behaviour of the hosts finally drives their guests to flee while the Blisses are so engaged in a family row that they do not notice their guests' furtive departure.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with seasonal allergies (hay fever), 72% report having nasal congestion, 65% report having cough, and 53% report having allergic reaction. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of seasonal allergies (hay fever) are allergic reaction, sneezing, and itchiness of eye, although you may still have seasonal allergies (hay fever) without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with seasonal allergies (hay fever) often receive complete physical skin exam performed (ml), other diagnostic procedures (interview; evaluation; consultation), lipid panel, other diagnostic procedures on skin and subcutaneous tissue, other therapeutic procedures, ophthalmologic and otologic diagnosis and treatment, ophthalmic examination and evaluation and diagnostic procedures on nose; mouth and pharynx .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with seasonal allergies (hay fever) include loratadine (claritin), fluticasone nasal product, cetirizine (zyrtec), mometasone nasal product, montelukast (singulair), fexofenadine (allegra), azelastine nasal, desloratadine (clarinex), fluticasone topical product, olopatadine ophthalmic, triamcinolone nasal product, budesonide nasal product and fexofenadine / pseudoephedrine .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for seasonal allergies (hay fever) include age 5-14 years age 1-4 years.

Age

< 1 years
0.3x
1-4 years
1.5x
5-14 years
2.6x
15-29 years
0.8x
30-44 years
1.0x
45-59 years
0.9x
60-74 years
0.7x
75+ years
0.5x

Sex

Male
1.0x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.0x
Hispanic
0.9x
White
1.0x
Other
1.3x
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