Think you might have this condition?

Use the Symptom Checker to check your symptoms

Add this to your profile
Banner for leaf pages 2

Rhabdomyolysis

Rhabdomyolysis /ˌræbdɵmaɪˈɒlɨsɪs/ is a condition in which damaged skeletal muscle tissue (Greek: ῥαβδω rhabdo- striped μυς myo- muscle) breaks down (Greek: λύσις –lysis) rapidly. Breakdown products of damaged muscle cells are released into the bloodstream; some of these, such as the protein myoglobin, are harmful to the kidneys and may lead to kidney failure. The severity of the symptoms, which may include muscle pains, vomiting and confusion, depends on the extent of muscle damage and whether kidney failure develops. The muscle damage may be caused by physical factors (e.g. crush injury, strenuous exercise), medications, drug abuse, and infections. Some people have a hereditary muscle condition that increases the risk of rhabdomyolysis. The diagnosis is usually made with blood tests and urinalysis. The mainstay of treatment is generous quantities of intravenous fluids, but may include dialysis or hemofiltration in more severe cases.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with rhabdomyolysis, 59% report having sharp chest pain, 54% report having depressive or psychotic symptoms, and 48% report having arm pain. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of rhabdomyolysis are hoarse voice, although you may still have rhabdomyolysis without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with rhabdomyolysis often receive hematologic tests, complete blood count, intravenous fluid replacement, kidney function tests, radiographic imaging procedure, cardiac enzymes measurement, urinalysis and electrolytes panel .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with rhabdomyolysis include sodium bicarbonate, haloperidol, olanzapine (zyprexa), magnesium oxide, naloxone (suboxone), nicotine, thiamine, gemfibrozil, methadone, chlorpheniramine / phenindamine / phenylpropanolamine, mecamylamine, grepafloxacin (raxar) and malathion topical .

Sodium Bicarbonate
$18
(21 days)
Haloperidol
$28
(28 days)
Olanzapine (Zyprexa)
$536
(28 days)
Magnesium Oxide
$6
(28 days)
Naloxone (Suboxone)
Under $1
(0 days)
Nicotine
$179
(21 days)
Thiamine
$3
(28 days)
Gemfibrozil
$18
(28 days)
Methadone
$20
(28 days)
Mecamylamine

Grepafloxacin (Raxar)

Malathion Topical

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for rhabdomyolysis include age 75+ years. On the other hand, race/ethnicity = other, age 5-14 years, age 1-4 years, and age < 1 years almost never get rhabdomyolysis.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.0x
15-29 years
1.1x
30-44 years
1.5x
45-59 years
0.9x
60-74 years
0.4x
75+ years
2.9x

Sex

Male
1.4x
Female
0.7x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.4x
Hispanic
0.4x
White
1.1x
Other
0.0x
Ajax-loader Loading...