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Premenstrual tension syndrome

Also known as PMS, Premenstrual Syndrome, and Premenstrual Tension

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) (Also known as Perimenstrual syndrome, due to symptoms appearing both before and after menses) is a collection of emotional symptoms, with or without physical symptoms, related to a woman's menstrual cycle. While most women of child-bearing age (up to 85%) report having experienced physical symptoms related to normal ovulatory function, such as bloating or breast tenderness, medical definitions of PMS are limited to a consistent pattern of emotional and physical symptoms occurring only during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle that are of "sufficient severity to interfere with some aspects of life". In particular, emotional symptoms must be present consistently to diagnose PMS. The specific emotional and physical symptoms attributable to PMS vary from woman to woman, but each individual woman's pattern of symptoms is predictable, occurs consistently during the ten days prior to menses, and vanishes either shortly before or shortly after the start of menstrual flow.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with premenstrual tension syndrome, 64% report having premenstrual tension or irritability, 56% report having headache, and 40% report having unpredictable menstruation. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of premenstrual tension syndrome are premenstrual tension or irritability, unpredictable menstruation, long menstrual periods, painful menstruation, and heavy menstrual flow, although you may still have premenstrual tension syndrome without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with premenstrual tension syndrome often receive pelvis exam, examination of breast, complete physical skin exam performed (ml), pap smear, depression screen, lipid panel, mammography and rectal examination .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with premenstrual tension syndrome include drospirenone / ethinyl estradiol, fluoxetine (prozac), citalopram (celexa), ortho cyclen, ethinyl estradiol / norgestrel, rizatriptan (maxalt), portia, frovatriptan (frova), progesterone, tamoxifen, nortriptyline, metaxalone (skelaxin) and buspirone (buspar) .

Fluoxetine (Prozac)
$13
(28 days)
Citalopram (Celexa)
$9
(28 days)
Ortho Cyclen
$26
(28 days)
Rizatriptan (Maxalt)
$262
(21 days)
Portia
$31
(28 days)
Frovatriptan (Frova)
$298
(21 days)
Progesterone
$56
(28 days)
Tamoxifen
$17
(28 days)
Nortriptyline
$8
(28 days)
Metaxalone (Skelaxin)
$223
(28 days)
Buspirone (Buspar)
$16
(28 days)

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for premenstrual tension syndrome include age 30-44 years sex == female. On the other hand, age 75+ years, sex == male, age 60-74 years, age 1-4 years, and age < 1 years almost never get premenstrual tension syndrome.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.9x
15-29 years
1.3x
30-44 years
2.9x
45-59 years
0.7x
60-74 years
0.0x
75+ years
0.0x

Sex

Male
0.0x
Female
1.7x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.7x
Hispanic
0.3x
White
1.3x
Other
1.2x
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