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Neonatal jaundice

Also known as Baby Jaundice, Infant Jaundice, Physiologic Jaundice In Newborn, and Icterus Neonatorum

Neonatal jaundice or Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, or Neonatal icterus (from the Greek word ίκτερος), attributive adjective: icteric, is a yellowing of the skin and other tissues of a newborn infant. A bilirubin level of more than 85 umol/l (5 mg/dL) manifests clinical jaundice in neonates whereas in adults a level of 34 umol/l (2 mg/dL) would look icteric. In newborns, jaundice is detected by blanching the skin with digital pressure so that it reveals underlying skin and subcutaneous tissue. Jaundiced newborns have an apparent icteric sclera, and yellowing of the face, extending down onto the chest.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with neonatal jaundice, 86% report having jaundice, 24% report having infant feeding problem, and 10% report having irritable infant. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of neonatal jaundice are jaundice, infant feeding problem, and recent weight loss, although you may still have neonatal jaundice without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with neonatal jaundice often receive hematologic tests, complete physical skin exam performed (ml), other diagnostic procedures (interview; evaluation; consultation), rectal examination, ophthalmic examination and evaluation, other therapeutic procedures, examination of foot and referral to home health care service .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with neonatal jaundice include hepatitis b vaccine (obsolete), erythromycin ophthalmic, triple dye topical and vitamin k 1 (mephyton) .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for neonatal jaundice include race/ethnicity = other, race/ethnicity = hispanic and age < 1 years. On the other hand, age 30-44 years, age 75+ years, age 60-74 years, age 5-14 years, age 15-29 years, and age 45-59 years almost never get neonatal jaundice.

Age

< 1 years
30.7x
1-4 years
0.1x
5-14 years
0.0x
15-29 years
0.0x
30-44 years
0.0x
45-59 years
0.0x
60-74 years
0.0x
75+ years
0.0x

Sex

Male
1.3x
Female
0.8x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.6x
Hispanic
2.1x
White
0.7x
Other
3.0x
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