Think you might have this condition?

Use the Symptom Checker to check your symptoms

Add this to your profile
Banner for leaf pages 2

Jaw disorder

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to talk, chew and yawn. For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause

  • Pain that travels through the face, jaw or neck
  • Stiff jaw muscles
  • Limited movement or locking of the jaw
  • Painful clicking or popping in the jaw
  • A change in the way the upper and lower teeth fit together

Jaw pain may go away with little or no treatment. Treatment may include simple things you can do yourself, such as eating soft foods or applying ice packs. It may also include pain medicines or devices to insert in your mouth. In rare cases, you might need surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Source: MedlinePlus

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with jaw disorder, 86% report having toothache, 81% report having facial pain, and 38% report having jaw swelling. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of jaw disorder are toothache, facial pain, gum pain, jaw swelling, mouth pain, neck mass, symptoms of the face, pain in gums, and jaw pain, although you may still have jaw disorder without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with jaw disorder often receive wound care management, traction; splints; and other wound care, incision and drainage and physical therapy exercises; manipulation; and other procedures .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with jaw disorder include penicillin, clindamycin, chlorhexidine topical, hydrocodone / ibuprofen, acetaminophen / aspirin / phenylpropanolamine, benzoin topical, tetanus immune globulin, human, methenamine, aztreonam, voriconazole, desflurane, hydrochlorothiazide / spironolactone and chlorpheniramine (c.p.m.) .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for jaw disorder include age 15-29 years. On the other hand, age 1-4 years and age < 1 years almost never get jaw disorder.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.3x
15-29 years
2.0x
30-44 years
1.5x
45-59 years
1.0x
60-74 years
0.5x
75+ years
0.6x

Sex

Male
0.9x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.1x
Hispanic
0.5x
White
1.1x
Other
0.3x
Ajax-loader Loading...