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Intestinal malabsorption

Also known as Steatorrhea and Fatty Stool

Malabsorption is a state arising from abnormality in absorption of food nutrients across the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with intestinal malabsorption, 64% report having diarrhea, 51% report having vomiting, and 43% report having sharp abdominal pain. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of intestinal malabsorption are allergic reaction, irritable infant, infant feeding problem, infant spitting up, and flatulence, although you may still have intestinal malabsorption without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with intestinal malabsorption often receive complete physical skin exam performed (ml), other diagnostic procedures (interview; evaluation; consultation), lipid panel, mental health counseling, depression screen, diagnostic ultrasound of heart (echocardiogram), other physical therapy and rehabilitation and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy; biopsy .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with intestinal malabsorption include vitamin b 12, calcium citrate, lansoprazole (prevacid), nystatin topical product, pancreatin, simethicone (degas), pancrelipase (pancrease), multivitamin with minerals, tobramycin (tobi), copper gluconate (preservision 2), penciclovir topical, ferric oxide, saccharated (venofer) and chlorzoxazone .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for intestinal malabsorption include age 1-4 years age < 1 years.

Age

< 1 years
14.4x
1-4 years
1.7x
5-14 years
1.5x
15-29 years
0.2x
30-44 years
0.3x
45-59 years
0.7x
60-74 years
0.1x
75+ years
0.4x

Sex

Male
1.2x
Female
0.8x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.0x
Hispanic
0.7x
White
1.1x
Other
0.2x
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