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Impetigo

Impetigo /ɪmpɨˈtaɪɡoʊ/ is a highly contagious bacterial skin infection most common among pre-school children. People who play close contact sports such as rugby, American football and wrestling are also susceptible, regardless of age. Impetigo is not as common in adults. The name derives from the Latin impetere ("assail"). It is also known as school sores.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with impetigo, 86% report having skin rash, 53% report having skin lesion, and 40% report having fever. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of impetigo are skin rash, skin on head or neck looks infected, mouth ulcer, and sore in nose, although you may still have impetigo without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with impetigo often receive complete physical skin exam performed (ml), microscopic examination (bacterial smear; culture; toxicology), culture wound, referral to home health care service and other therapeutic ear procedures .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with impetigo include mupirocin topical, cephalexin, retapamulin topical, permethrin topical, cefadroxil, chlorhexidine topical, dicloxacillin, fluocinolone topical, chlorpheniramine / dextromethorphan / phenylephrine, desonide topical, ethionamide, iothalamate and betaxolol .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for impetigo include age 5-14 years, age 1-4 years and age < 1 years.

Age

< 1 years
1.9x
1-4 years
5.1x
5-14 years
3.6x
15-29 years
0.6x
30-44 years
0.4x
45-59 years
0.4x
60-74 years
0.2x
75+ years
0.2x

Sex

Male
1.1x
Female
0.9x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.9x
Hispanic
1.2x
White
1.0x
Other
1.4x
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