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Hypovolemia

Also known as Fluid Volume Deficit and Fluid volume depletion

In physiology and medicine, hypovolemia (also hypovolaemia, oligemia or shock) is a state of decreased blood volume; more specifically, decrease in volume of blood plasma. It is thus the intravascular component of volume contraction (or loss of blood volume due to things such as hemorrhaging or dehydration), but, as it also is the most essential one, hypovolemia and volume contraction are sometimes used synonymously.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with hypovolemia, 83% report having vomiting, 69% report having diarrhea, and 67% report having nausea. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of hypovolemia are fluid retention, although you may still have hypovolemia without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with hypovolemia often receive hematologic tests, complete blood count, intravenous fluid replacement, kidney function tests, urinalysis, glucose measurement, electrolytes panel and radiographic imaging procedure .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with hypovolemia include sodium polystyrene sulfonate (kayexalate), trimethobenzamide (tigan), amylases, electrolyte replacement solutions, oral, aluminum hydroxide (m.a.h.), erythromycin / sulfisoxazole, acetaminophen / dextromethorphan / doxylamine / pseudoephedrine, dasatinib, benzthiazide (exna), amifostine, tranexamic acid, lvp solution and meclofenamate .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for hypovolemia include age 75+ years.

Age

< 1 years
1.2x
1-4 years
1.5x
5-14 years
0.8x
15-29 years
1.1x
30-44 years
0.8x
45-59 years
0.7x
60-74 years
0.9x
75+ years
2.0x

Sex

Male
1.0x
Female
1.0x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.9x
Hispanic
0.9x
White
1.1x
Other
1.0x
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