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Endometrial hyperplasia

Endometrial hyperplasia is a condition of excessive proliferation of the cells of the endometrium, or inner lining of the uterus.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with endometrial hyperplasia, 53% report having vaginal bleeding after menopause, 45% report having heavy menstrual flow, and 35% report having unpredictable menstruation. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of endometrial hyperplasia are vaginal bleeding after menopause, heavy menstrual flow, unpredictable menstruation, pus in sputum, muscle swelling, elbow cramps or spasms, abnormal size or shape of ear, back weakness, and low back weakness, although you may still have endometrial hyperplasia without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with endometrial hyperplasia often receive pelvis exam, biopsy, complete physical skin exam performed (ml), excision, ultrasonography, examination of breast, other diagnostic procedures; female organs and rectal examination .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with endometrial hyperplasia include medroxyprogesterone, megestrol (megace), estradiol, cefazolin, allopurinol, sorbitol, misoprostol, indapamide, chlorpromazine (thorazine), calcium acetate, valproic acid, terconazole topical and metronidazole topical product .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for endometrial hyperplasia include sex == female age 45-59 years. On the other hand, sex == male, age 5-14 years, age 1-4 years, and age < 1 years almost never get endometrial hyperplasia.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.0x
15-29 years
0.4x
30-44 years
1.4x
45-59 years
2.6x
60-74 years
0.7x
75+ years
0.5x

Sex

Male
0.0x
Female
1.7x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.7x
Hispanic
0.9x
White
1.1x
Other
1.0x
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