Think you might have this condition?

Use the Symptom Checker to check your symptoms

Add this to your profile
Banner for leaf pages 2

Drug abuse (opioids)

Also known as Opioid Abuse and Opiate Abuse

Opioid dependence is a medical diagnosis characterized by an individual's inability to stop using opiates (morphine, heroin, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, etc.) even when objectively it is in his or her best interest to do so, and is a major component of opioid addiction. In 1964 the WHO Expert Committee on Drug Dependence introduced "dependence" as "A cluster of physiological, behavioural and cognitive phenomena of variable intensity, in which the use of a psychoactive drug (or drugs) takes on a high priority. The necessary descriptive characteristics are preoccupation with a desire to obtain and take the drug and persistent drug-seeking behaviour. Determinants and problematic consequences of drug dependence may be biological, psychological or social, and usually interact". The core concept of the WHO definition of "drug dependence" requires the presence of a strong desire or a sense of compulsion to take the drug; and the WHO and DSM-IV-TR clinical guidelines for a definite diagnosis of "dependence" require that three or more of the following six characteristic features be experienced or exhibited:

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with drug abuse (opioids), 67% report having drug abuse, 46% report having depressive or psychotic symptoms, and 40% report having depression. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of drug abuse (opioids) are drug abuse, although you may still have drug abuse (opioids) without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with drug abuse (opioids) often receive mental health counseling, psychotherapy, urinalysis, depression screen, toxicology screen, blood alcohol, psychological and psychiatric evaluation and therapy and microscopic examination (bacterial smear; culture; toxicology) .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with drug abuse (opioids) include buprenorphine / naloxone, methadone, buprenorphine (suboxone), naloxone (suboxone), naltrexone, chlordiazepoxide, paliperidone (invega), acamprosate (campral), trimipramine, pergolide, magnesium lactate, hydrocortisone-neomycin topical and interferon alfa-2a .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for drug abuse (opioids) include age 30-44 years age 15-29 years. On the other hand, age 75+ years, age 1-4 years, and age < 1 years almost never get drug abuse (opioids).

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.1x
15-29 years
1.6x
30-44 years
2.1x
45-59 years
1.3x
60-74 years
0.3x
75+ years
0.0x

Sex

Male
1.4x
Female
0.7x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.1x
Hispanic
0.6x
White
1.1x
Other
0.6x
Ajax-loader Loading...