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Diabetic retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy, () is retinopathy (damage to the retina) caused by complications of diabetes, which can eventually lead to blindness. It is an ocular manifestation of diabetes, a systemic disease, which affects up to 80 percent of all patients who have had diabetes for 10 years or more. Despite these intimidating statistics, research indicates that at least 90% of these new cases could be reduced if there was proper and vigilant treatment and monitoring of the eyes. The longer a person has diabetes, the higher his or her chances of developing diabetic retinopathy.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with diabetic retinopathy, 71% report having diminished vision, 33% report having spots or clouds in vision, and 25% report having pain in eye. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of diabetic retinopathy are diminished vision, spots or clouds in vision, lacrimation, foreign body sensation in eye, blindness, bleeding from eye, and abnormal movement of eyelid, although you may still have diabetic retinopathy without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with diabetic retinopathy often receive other therapeutic procedures on eyelids; conjunctiva; cornea, ophthalmic examination and evaluation, ophthalmologic and otologic diagnosis and treatment, hemoglobin a1c measurement, repair of retinal tear; detachment, other extraocular muscle and orbit therapeutic procedures, other intraocular therapeutic procedures and destruction of lesion of retina and choroid .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with diabetic retinopathy include insulin, insulin glargine (lantus), tropicamide ophthalmic, phenylephrine (duramax), insulin, aspart, human (novolog), brimonidine ophthalmic, prednisolone ophthalmic, bevacizumab (avastin), rosiglitazone (avandia), latanoprost, gatifloxacin (zymar), timolol and bimatoprost ophthalmic .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for diabetic retinopathy include age 75+ years, age 60-74 years and age 45-59 years. On the other hand, age 5-14 years, age 1-4 years, and age < 1 years almost never get diabetic retinopathy.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.0x
15-29 years
0.1x
30-44 years
0.4x
45-59 years
1.6x
60-74 years
2.8x
75+ years
1.6x

Sex

Male
1.1x
Female
0.9x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.2x
Hispanic
1.1x
White
0.9x
Other
1.3x
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