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Athlete's foot

Also known as Tinea Pedis and Foot Ringworm

Athlete's foot (also known as ringworm of the foot and tinea pedis) is a fungal infection of the skin that causes scaling, flaking, and itch of affected areas, and in severe cases, swelling and amputation of the foot. It is caused by fungi in the genus Trichophyton. While it is typically transmitted in moist communal areas where people walk barefoot, such as showers or bathhouses, the disease requires a warm moist environment, such as the inside of a shoe, in order to incubate. Because of this the fungus only affects approximately 0.75% of habitually (frequently) barefoot people.

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with athlete's foot, 65% report having skin rash, 61% report having foot or toe pain, and 48% report having itching of skin. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of athlete's foot are itching of skin, skin dryness, peeling, scaliness, or roughness, skin on leg or foot looks infected, foot or toe swelling, skin irritation, irregular appearing nails, and irregular appearing scalp, although you may still have athlete's foot without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with athlete's foot often receive complete physical skin exam performed (ml), examination of foot, lipid panel, wound care management, excision, hemoglobin a1c measurement, depression screen and prostate specific antigen measurement .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with athlete's foot include clotrimazole topical, terbinafine topical, ketoconazole, nystatin topical product, econazole topical, fluconazole (diflucan), ciclopirox topical, betamethasone-clotrimazole topical, clobetasol topical, triamcinolone, naftifine topical, griseofulvin and butenafine topical .

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for athlete's foot include age 30-44 years sex == male. On the other hand, age < 1 years almost never get athlete's foot.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.2x
5-14 years
1.2x
15-29 years
0.8x
30-44 years
1.6x
45-59 years
1.2x
60-74 years
0.8x
75+ years
0.5x

Sex

Male
1.5x
Female
0.6x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
1.3x
Hispanic
1.2x
White
0.9x
Other
0.7x
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