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Angina

Also known as Angina Pectoris, Cardiac Angina, Ischemic Chest Pain, and Anginal Syndrome

Angina pectoris – commonly known as angina – is chest pain due to ischemia of the heart muscle, generally due to obstruction or spasm of the coronary arteries. The main cause of Angina pectoris is coronary artery disease, due to atherosclerosis of the arteries feeding the heart. The term derives from the Latin angina ("infection of the throat") from the Greek ἀγχόνη ankhonē ("strangling"), and the Latin pectus ("chest"), and can therefore be translated as "a strangling feeling in the chest".

Source: Wikipedia

What are the symptoms?

Within all the people who go to their doctor with angina, 92% report having sharp chest pain, 59% report having shortness of breath, and 40% report having chest tightness. The symptoms that are highly suggestive of angina are sharp chest pain and chest tightness, although you may still have angina without those symptoms.


What might my doctor prescribe?

Common Tests and Procedures

Patients with angina often receive electrocardiogram, hematologic tests, radiographic imaging procedure, complete blood count, plain x-ray, cardiac enzymes measurement, kidney function tests and intravenous fluid replacement .

Common Medications

The most commonly prescribed drugs for patients with angina include aspirin, nitroglycerin, clopidogrel (plavix), enoxaparin (lovenox), heparin, isosorbide, oxygen, isosorbide mononitrate (ismo), ranolazine (ranexa), pentoxifylline, eptifibatide (integrilin), betaxolol and isosorbide dinitrate .

Aspirin
$3
(28 days)
Nitroglycerin
$31
(28 days)
Clopidogrel (Plavix)
$151
(28 days)
Enoxaparin (Lovenox)
$467
(7 days)
Heparin
$52
(7 days)
Isosorbide
$12
(28 days)
Oxygen

Isosorbide Mononitrate (Ismo)

Ranolazine (Ranexa)
$209
(28 days)
Pentoxifylline
$18
(28 days)
Eptifibatide (Integrilin)

Betaxolol
$75
(28 days)
Isosorbide Dinitrate
$10
(28 days)

Who is at risk?

Groups of people at highest risk for angina include age 75+ years age 60-74 years. On the other hand, age 5-14 years, age 1-4 years, age 15-29 years, and age < 1 years almost never get angina.

Age

< 1 years
0.0x
1-4 years
0.0x
5-14 years
0.0x
15-29 years
0.0x
30-44 years
0.4x
45-59 years
1.5x
60-74 years
2.2x
75+ years
3.0x

Sex

Male
1.2x
Female
0.8x

Race/Ethnicity

Black
0.7x
Hispanic
0.6x
White
1.2x
Other
0.9x
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